ON THE COVER

The SMIT LiPuma’ pictured delivering bunkers to a vessel calling at the Port of Durban. SMIT Amandla Marine’s Bunker Barge Manager Gerad Singh:  “This year in our operations in Durban and Richard’s Bay we are focussing our efforts on improving our systems, processes and procedures – from barge maintenance to training & development. We believe that these foundation blocks of our business, along with SHE-Q and the proactive management thereof, are critical to maintaining our position as market leader.
“A new Service Evaluation mechanism introduced to Clients at the end of 2010 will ensure that the team keeps their eye on the ball – and meets the high standards of the oil industry. Proactive oil spill prevention and the management of onboard safety is key. We also aim to keep communication flowing and try to stay a ‘step ahead’ by keeping Clients informed and by finding solutions to any problems that could prevent bunker delivery at the best time in terms of keeping the ship on schedule.”

  

The SMIT LiPuma’ pictured delivering bunkers to a vessel calling at the Port of Durban. SMIT Amandla Marine’s Bunker Barge Manager Gerad Singh:  “This year in our operations in Durban and Richard’s Bay we are focussing our efforts on improving our systems, processes and procedures – from barge maintenance to training & development. We believe that these foundation blocks of our business, along with SHE-Q and the proactive management thereof, are critical to maintaining our position as market leader.
“A new Service Evaluation mechanism introduced to Clients at the end of 2010 will ensure that the team keeps their eye on the ball – and meets the high standards of the oil industry. Proactive oil spill prevention and the management of onboard safety is key. We also aim to keep communication flowing and try to stay a ‘step ahead’ by keeping Clients informed and by finding solutions to any problems that could prevent bunker delivery at the best time in terms of keeping the ship on schedule.”

  

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Contents

IN DEPTH:

EXPERIMENTAL FISHING: Two of the biggest companies in the small pelagic fishery are testing the viability of midwater trawlers for catching anchovy and other under-utilised small pelagic resources, including redeye herring and lanternfish. Claire Attwood takes up the story of experimental fishing in our waters.

PORT USERS LINE UP TO COMPLAIN: It’s an issue that has been plaguing the port for some time and it’s one that is perfectly visual in its impact. The long lines of stationary trucks that oftentimes clog up the service roads in and out of the port may be a nuisance to those who need to access businesses or clients in the port, but to the truckers and their clients it’s altogether more disruptive. Colleen Jacka has been following the dialogue between the Harbour Carriers Association and the Cape Town Container Terminal (CTCT) management for some months and provides some insight into the issues that are still putting strain on the businesses that rely on an efficient turnaround time in the port to ensure productivity and profitability.


PIRACY PAGES:

UP IN ARMS: The number of vessels that are being attacked by pirates is continuing at an alarming rate. As a result, many owners are now placing guns on board the vessels together with security guards. We have alerted all the international group of P&I Clubs to the rules and regulations on how this affects vessels calling at South African ports.

  • Incidents of piracy still continue to rise
  • Shipping industry changes stance on armed guards
  • IUMI Welcomes ICS Decision on Shipboard Guards
  • UK announces £6 million for action against piracy.

REPORT BACK:

THE DARK CONTINENT IS NO MORE: At the first (and rather poorly attended) Harbour and Ports in Africa conference (HAPIA), held in Durban from 28-31 March, maritime representatives from across Africa discussed what steps need to be taken to sustain future growth in Africa’s maritime trade.


SHIP REPAIR AND BUILDING 

  • Cape Town restricted to two abnormal structures
  • Port of Ngqura to accommodate rig refurbishment project
  • Expanding into Africa
  • Lack of long-term lease impacts future of Cape boat builders
  • Onsite in Namibia
  • Dock take-over delayed
  • Optimistic outlook for future marine-related work
  • Pride South Seas at A Berth
  • Taking ship repair offshore
  • Saldanha Bay’s star is rising
  • Celtic Sea brings more rig work to Saldanha Bay
  • Gigantic Ships of the future
  • Laser alignment technology aids in ship maintenance
  • Apprenticeship programme
     

BUNKER INDUSTRY:

  • Appointment at OW Bunkers
  • IBIA annual convention dates
  • Sri Lanka invests in bunkers
  • Emission trading scheme
  • A trader with global vision
  • Reliable supply is key to future of SA bunkering
  • Collusion and anti-competitive behaviour highlighted


OFFSHORE NEWS

  • Campaigning for local content in the Ghana oil industry
  • Natural gas tipped to meet the energy needs of the future
  • Ultra deepwater drillship fleet signed into production


MARITIME NEWS

  • Angola, Namibia and South Africa prepare to sign Benguela Convention
  • Final link in Africa search and rescue cover
  • Walvis handles record number of vehicles
  • Nigerian port activity increases
  • New plant to aid dust control at Saldanha
  • Extending range of fleet handling equipment
  • Launch service
  • Aground
  • Estuaries website
  • Navy contracts
  • Power packs brimming withenergy
  • Product news: Side sonar
  • Clarifying scope of duties in salvage case
  • Tracking consignments
  • Container protection

MARITIME MEMORIES:

Brian Ingpen takes us back to the times of a booming South African ship building sector.


ON THE QUAYSIDE

As the general manager of SAMTRA (South African Maritime Training Academy), Andy MacLennan is intimately aware of the challenges and opportunities that face those keen on pursuing a sea-going career. Having recently been contracted by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) to act as a placing agency to secure training berths for cadets onboard trading vessels, SAMTRA is now in a key position to assist in ensuring the successful entry into the maritime industry of many South African cadets. Colleen Jacka spoke to him about the maritime training sector.


PEOPLE AND EVENT

  • Offshore and ship repair golf  day photos
  • SAMSA launches cadet programme
  • Durban vessel naming marks first for international shipping line
  • Appointment at Wilhelmsen
  • New environmental association
  • Nigerian port officer wins IAPH essay competition
  • SAAFF Congress 2011
  • Shepstone and Wylie cocktail party

 

 

IN DEPTH:

EXPERIMENTAL FISHING: Two of the biggest companies in the small pelagic fishery are testing the viability of midwater trawlers for catching anchovy and other under-utilised small pelagic resources, including redeye herring and lanternfish. Claire Attwood takes up the story of experimental fishing in our waters.

PORT USERS LINE UP TO COMPLAIN: It’s an issue that has been plaguing the port for some time and it’s one that is perfectly visual in its impact. The long lines of stationary trucks that oftentimes clog up the service roads in and out of the port may be a nuisance to those who need to access businesses or clients in the port, but to the truckers and their clients it’s altogether more disruptive. Colleen Jacka has been following the dialogue between the Harbour Carriers Association and the Cape Town Container Terminal (CTCT) management for some months and provides some insight into the issues that are still putting strain on the businesses that rely on an efficient turnaround time in the port to ensure productivity and profitability.


PIRACY PAGES:

UP IN ARMS: The number of vessels that are being attacked by pirates is continuing at an alarming rate. As a result, many owners are now placing guns on board the vessels together with security guards. We have alerted all the international group of P&I Clubs to the rules and regulations on how this affects vessels calling at South African ports.

  • Incidents of piracy still continue to rise
  • Shipping industry changes stance on armed guards
  • IUMI Welcomes ICS Decision on Shipboard Guards
  • UK announces £6 million for action against piracy.

REPORT BACK:

THE DARK CONTINENT IS NO MORE: At the first (and rather poorly attended) Harbour and Ports in Africa conference (HAPIA), held in Durban from 28-31 March, maritime representatives from across Africa discussed what steps need to be taken to sustain future growth in Africa’s maritime trade.


SHIP REPAIR AND BUILDING 

  • Cape Town restricted to two abnormal structures
  • Port of Ngqura to accommodate rig refurbishment project
  • Expanding into Africa
  • Lack of long-term lease impacts future of Cape boat builders
  • Onsite in Namibia
  • Dock take-over delayed
  • Optimistic outlook for future marine-related work
  • Pride South Seas at A Berth
  • Taking ship repair offshore
  • Saldanha Bay’s star is rising
  • Celtic Sea brings more rig work to Saldanha Bay
  • Gigantic Ships of the future
  • Laser alignment technology aids in ship maintenance
  • Apprenticeship programme
     

BUNKER INDUSTRY:

  • Appointment at OW Bunkers
  • IBIA annual convention dates
  • Sri Lanka invests in bunkers
  • Emission trading scheme
  • A trader with global vision
  • Reliable supply is key to future of SA bunkering
  • Collusion and anti-competitive behaviour highlighted


OFFSHORE NEWS

  • Campaigning for local content in the Ghana oil industry
  • Natural gas tipped to meet the energy needs of the future
  • Ultra deepwater drillship fleet signed into production


MARITIME NEWS

  • Angola, Namibia and South Africa prepare to sign Benguela Convention
  • Final link in Africa search and rescue cover
  • Walvis handles record number of vehicles
  • Nigerian port activity increases
  • New plant to aid dust control at Saldanha
  • Extending range of fleet handling equipment
  • Launch service
  • Aground
  • Estuaries website
  • Navy contracts
  • Power packs brimming withenergy
  • Product news: Side sonar
  • Clarifying scope of duties in salvage case
  • Tracking consignments
  • Container protection

MARITIME MEMORIES:

Brian Ingpen takes us back to the times of a booming South African ship building sector.


ON THE QUAYSIDE

As the general manager of SAMTRA (South African Maritime Training Academy), Andy MacLennan is intimately aware of the challenges and opportunities that face those keen on pursuing a sea-going career. Having recently been contracted by the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) to act as a placing agency to secure training berths for cadets onboard trading vessels, SAMTRA is now in a key position to assist in ensuring the successful entry into the maritime industry of many South African cadets. Colleen Jacka spoke to him about the maritime training sector.


PEOPLE AND EVENT

  • Offshore and ship repair golf  day photos
  • SAMSA launches cadet programme
  • Durban vessel naming marks first for international shipping line
  • Appointment at Wilhelmsen
  • New environmental association
  • Nigerian port officer wins IAPH essay competition
  • SAAFF Congress 2011
  • Shepstone and Wylie cocktail party

 

 

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EDITOR: Colleen Jacka

Read Colleen's maritime blog at www.maritimematters.net


KEELHAULED:
The Cape Town port management responsible for the decision to restrict the entry of "abnormal structures" in the port to only two at a time!


APPLAUD:
Chevron in Cape Town for a change in strategy that has seen the bunker industry benefit from reliability of supply.

Transnet port management in Port Elizabeth and Saldanha who have contributed to the respective ports being able to accommodate oil rig work.


 


EDITOR: Colleen Jacka

Read Colleen's maritime blog at www.maritimematters.net


KEELHAULED:
The Cape Town port management responsible for the decision to restrict the entry of "abnormal structures" in the port to only two at a time!


APPLAUD:
Chevron in Cape Town for a change in strategy that has seen the bunker industry benefit from reliability of supply.

Transnet port management in Port Elizabeth and Saldanha who have contributed to the respective ports being able to accommodate oil rig work.