ON THE COVER

 Another first for bunkering by barge in South Africa, Queen Mary 2 being bunkered simultaneously by the two Unical bunker tankers, Southern Venture and Fumana. Passenger liners run on a very tight schedule and normally lifts relatively big volumes of fuel in Durban. Time allocated for the bunkering operation in this instance was less than eight hours, which was more than sufficient to deliver the 1,750mt of MFO ordered, considering that both the tankers are capable of delivering at a rate of 750mt per hour.
 
The challenge was to deliver 700mt of Bunker Gas Oil, concurrently with the HFO. The tankers carry 3,100mt of HFO and 355mt of BGO each, with maximum pumping rate for BGO being 150mt per hour. It was thus critical to have both tankers alongside at the same time, with Fumana delivering 1,750mt of HFO and 350mt of BGO, while Southern Venture delivered the balance of 350mt of BGO at a different manifold. The entire operation took less than five hours.
 
Not too many ships at sea today are fitted with multiple bunker manifolds. The QM 2’s tight schedule clearly encouraged her designers to add this feature to this magnificent ship. The sheer size of QM 2 would be appreciated when considering that the banker tankers have an overall length of 70m.

  

 Another first for bunkering by barge in South Africa, Queen Mary 2 being bunkered simultaneously by the two Unical bunker tankers, Southern Venture and Fumana. Passenger liners run on a very tight schedule and normally lifts relatively big volumes of fuel in Durban. Time allocated for the bunkering operation in this instance was less than eight hours, which was more than sufficient to deliver the 1,750mt of MFO ordered, considering that both the tankers are capable of delivering at a rate of 750mt per hour.
 
The challenge was to deliver 700mt of Bunker Gas Oil, concurrently with the HFO. The tankers carry 3,100mt of HFO and 355mt of BGO each, with maximum pumping rate for BGO being 150mt per hour. It was thus critical to have both tankers alongside at the same time, with Fumana delivering 1,750mt of HFO and 350mt of BGO, while Southern Venture delivered the balance of 350mt of BGO at a different manifold. The entire operation took less than five hours.
 
Not too many ships at sea today are fitted with multiple bunker manifolds. The QM 2’s tight schedule clearly encouraged her designers to add this feature to this magnificent ship. The sheer size of QM 2 would be appreciated when considering that the banker tankers have an overall length of 70m.

  

Print  


 








 


 




 





 


 


 








 


 




 





 


 

Text/HTML

Print  

Contents

IN DEPTH:

ISLAND IN CRISIS: The first indications of a likely oil spill was evident less than 24 hours after the 75 000 tonne bulk carrier MS Oliva ran aground at Spinners Point on Nightingale Island on 16 March. While the cause of the grounding is still unclear, what ensued was a Herculean effort on the part of the Tristan da Cunha islanders to mobilise and respond to the crewmembers; the potential wreck and the animal life that was sadly affected by the spill. Colleen Jacka reviews the incident and finds out why the island and fishing industry could stand to lose an important part of their livelihood in the aftermath of this disaster.


 IN PHOTOS:

SNOEK RUN: A prolonged and unexpected summer snoek run turned the slipway at Miller"s Point on the Cape Peninsula into a hive of activity. Between 60 and 70 commercial linefish boats launched at Miller"s Point during the height of the run, returning to shore with catches of about three tons of snoek each on good fishing days.


PIRACY PAGES:

A NAVAL RESPONSE: Many of the world`'s navies have weighed in the fight against piracy. In this issue we take a look at which navies have shown their muscle in the area.


REPORT BACK:

COLLABORATIVE CRUISE: Two of our fisheries inspectors recently returned from an Austrialian led sea patrol where they gained valuable experience and advocate further collaboration with international counterparts to strengthen the country"s ability to tackle issues of illegal fishing. 


HYDROGRAPHY AND MARINE SURVEY 

  • Marine survey trials undertaken in Cape Town with good results
  • Hydrography Society seeks to appeal to a wider audience
  • Record-breaking Ocean Business draws global attention
  • NEw agency and continued orders fuel future developments
  • Hydrography goes down under
  • Local marine survey company aims high
  • Using AV's in marine survey environments

SAFETY & SECURITY:

  • Aim to avoid accidents
  • IMO reports back
  • NSRI craft gets new lease on life
  • Industry briefs
  • Positive trend in ship safety is broken
  • Legal cooperation needed to combat maritime crime in Africa
  • New safety initiative presented to IMO
  • Lack of training effects onboard safety
  • Call for fair treatment of seafers after accidents at sea
  • SAMSA introduces main stream press to maritime security initiatives

OFFSHORE NEWS

  • Saldanha welcomes a new visitor
  • Strengthening Nambian diamond partnership
  • Mammoth testing project uses stud link chains
  • SA High Commission in Ghana invites South African companies
  • Ghana finds favour with oil shares
  • New engines aimed at the oil and gas industry

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

  • EU seeks solution to discard fisheries
  • Comprehensive review concludes equipment supply will be tight in the shipping industry
  • Seafarers' minimum wage to rise
  • E-learning diploma launched for the marine industry
  • Cruise and energy markets are the ones to watch
  • Addressing GHG's in Asia's developing countries
  • Japanese shipyard orders ballast water treatment systems

MARITIME NEWS

  • Providing an interface between the public and the maritime world
  • High-speed undersea cable landed on the West Coast
  • Reefer express returns to meet demands
  • Development of the South African National Coastal and Marine Atlas
  • Instability in Libya prompts call to close tuna fishery
  • New cranes boost intermodal efficiency
  • Maritime briefs
  • Maputo port poised for continued growth
  • Minister announces multi-million abalone breeding project fo Gansbaai
  • Bert River estuary a model of its kind
  • Local online ship tracking goes international

MARITIME MEMORIES:

Brian Ingpen remembers a time when shipping was not automated and when there was still time to go ashore and buy a gift for the family when visiting foreign ports.


ON THE QUAYSIDE

Warwick Blyth has been in his current position as the CEO of the South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA) for 18 months now. In that time he has aimed to stablise strategies of the industry body and feels comfortable discussing the road ahead. Colleen Jacka sat down with him to get an understanding of where he sees SAOGA positiioning itself in both the short and longer terms.


PEOPLE AND EVENT

  • Joint research project launched
  • Namibia to host the 37th PMEASA Council Meeting
  • Svitzer appointment
  • Transnet appointment
  • De Beers appointment
  • SAASOA appointment
  • New simulator upgrades Simons Town training facilitie
  • DAFF appointments
  • Day of the Seafarer
  • SAMSA sponsors the National Boat Show

 

 

IN DEPTH:

ISLAND IN CRISIS: The first indications of a likely oil spill was evident less than 24 hours after the 75 000 tonne bulk carrier MS Oliva ran aground at Spinners Point on Nightingale Island on 16 March. While the cause of the grounding is still unclear, what ensued was a Herculean effort on the part of the Tristan da Cunha islanders to mobilise and respond to the crewmembers; the potential wreck and the animal life that was sadly affected by the spill. Colleen Jacka reviews the incident and finds out why the island and fishing industry could stand to lose an important part of their livelihood in the aftermath of this disaster.


 IN PHOTOS:

SNOEK RUN: A prolonged and unexpected summer snoek run turned the slipway at Miller"s Point on the Cape Peninsula into a hive of activity. Between 60 and 70 commercial linefish boats launched at Miller"s Point during the height of the run, returning to shore with catches of about three tons of snoek each on good fishing days.


PIRACY PAGES:

A NAVAL RESPONSE: Many of the world`'s navies have weighed in the fight against piracy. In this issue we take a look at which navies have shown their muscle in the area.


REPORT BACK:

COLLABORATIVE CRUISE: Two of our fisheries inspectors recently returned from an Austrialian led sea patrol where they gained valuable experience and advocate further collaboration with international counterparts to strengthen the country"s ability to tackle issues of illegal fishing. 


HYDROGRAPHY AND MARINE SURVEY 

  • Marine survey trials undertaken in Cape Town with good results
  • Hydrography Society seeks to appeal to a wider audience
  • Record-breaking Ocean Business draws global attention
  • NEw agency and continued orders fuel future developments
  • Hydrography goes down under
  • Local marine survey company aims high
  • Using AV's in marine survey environments

SAFETY & SECURITY:

  • Aim to avoid accidents
  • IMO reports back
  • NSRI craft gets new lease on life
  • Industry briefs
  • Positive trend in ship safety is broken
  • Legal cooperation needed to combat maritime crime in Africa
  • New safety initiative presented to IMO
  • Lack of training effects onboard safety
  • Call for fair treatment of seafers after accidents at sea
  • SAMSA introduces main stream press to maritime security initiatives

OFFSHORE NEWS

  • Saldanha welcomes a new visitor
  • Strengthening Nambian diamond partnership
  • Mammoth testing project uses stud link chains
  • SA High Commission in Ghana invites South African companies
  • Ghana finds favour with oil shares
  • New engines aimed at the oil and gas industry

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

  • EU seeks solution to discard fisheries
  • Comprehensive review concludes equipment supply will be tight in the shipping industry
  • Seafarers' minimum wage to rise
  • E-learning diploma launched for the marine industry
  • Cruise and energy markets are the ones to watch
  • Addressing GHG's in Asia's developing countries
  • Japanese shipyard orders ballast water treatment systems

MARITIME NEWS

  • Providing an interface between the public and the maritime world
  • High-speed undersea cable landed on the West Coast
  • Reefer express returns to meet demands
  • Development of the South African National Coastal and Marine Atlas
  • Instability in Libya prompts call to close tuna fishery
  • New cranes boost intermodal efficiency
  • Maritime briefs
  • Maputo port poised for continued growth
  • Minister announces multi-million abalone breeding project fo Gansbaai
  • Bert River estuary a model of its kind
  • Local online ship tracking goes international

MARITIME MEMORIES:

Brian Ingpen remembers a time when shipping was not automated and when there was still time to go ashore and buy a gift for the family when visiting foreign ports.


ON THE QUAYSIDE

Warwick Blyth has been in his current position as the CEO of the South African Oil and Gas Alliance (SAOGA) for 18 months now. In that time he has aimed to stablise strategies of the industry body and feels comfortable discussing the road ahead. Colleen Jacka sat down with him to get an understanding of where he sees SAOGA positiioning itself in both the short and longer terms.


PEOPLE AND EVENT

  • Joint research project launched
  • Namibia to host the 37th PMEASA Council Meeting
  • Svitzer appointment
  • Transnet appointment
  • De Beers appointment
  • SAASOA appointment
  • New simulator upgrades Simons Town training facilitie
  • DAFF appointments
  • Day of the Seafarer
  • SAMSA sponsors the National Boat Show

 

 

Print  


EDITOR: Colleen Jacka


Read Colleen's maritime blog at www.maritimematters.net


KEELHAULED:
In a situation such as that which arose off the islands of Tristan da Cunha, the need for communication is paramount to maintaining relationships that will result in the best outcome. The report that the management of Ovenstone was unable to get clarity from the insurers is disappointing!


APPLAUD:

The Tristan da Cunha islanders should be commended for their efforts to become involved in the clean-up and monitoring of oil pollution around the islands - and for housing the crew of the stricken Oliva.

In an effort to better equip the mainstream media to write about the maritime industry, the South African Maritime Safety Authority hosted a delegation of journalists from around the country in Cape Town to showcase aspects of the ports, shipping and their involvement with maritime safety.


 



EDITOR: Colleen Jacka


Read Colleen's maritime blog at www.maritimematters.net


KEELHAULED:
In a situation such as that which arose off the islands of Tristan da Cunha, the need for communication is paramount to maintaining relationships that will result in the best outcome. The report that the management of Ovenstone was unable to get clarity from the insurers is disappointing!


APPLAUD:

The Tristan da Cunha islanders should be commended for their efforts to become involved in the clean-up and monitoring of oil pollution around the islands - and for housing the crew of the stricken Oliva.

In an effort to better equip the mainstream media to write about the maritime industry, the South African Maritime Safety Authority hosted a delegation of journalists from around the country in Cape Town to showcase aspects of the ports, shipping and their involvement with maritime safety.